Category: News
03 November 2018

Well it's been a long month, but we're happy to announce that we've completed the first phase of Webplanner.com's transition from Silverlight. At the beginning of October we introduced the HTML5 version of our online project management service, but we had to keep the Silverlight site around for another month to facilitate the transition for existing subscribers.

Now that we've fazed out the Silverlight site, we've been able to bring the application server and the database server under one roof, and increase the performance by tenfold. Yes, you read that right, it's actually 10x faster than before!

Category: News
01 November 2018

As we announced at the beginning of October, the Silverlight version of Webplanner.com was discontinued last night, and we’re moving ahead with strictly the HTML5 version of our online project management service.

We announced the release of Webplanner HTML5 version on October 3rd, and advised all Silverlight subscribers to migrate their projects over to the new platform before the start of November so that we could phase out the data servers those relied on.

Category: News
24 October 2018

It’s taken most of the year, but we’re happy to announce the release of the new Webplanner.com, the award winning online project management tool for anyone who plans projects. Now available in HTML5, Webplanner.com works on most platforms, including PC and MAC, as well as Android and IOS mobile devices.

The implications of this change for our subscribers are exciting:

Category: News
24 October 2018

It's been a long 9-month process to modernize the Webplanner platform to contemporary HTML5 format, but that stage is finally complete. On Wednesday, October 3rd we announced the launch of this updated service, and the response has been great, but it should be understood that this is only the first stage of a two step process.

Webplanner was originally architected to have two separate servers, one database server for the project data and a separate application server that the subscribers interfaces with. This structure serves two purposes - the first is to keep the user data safely offline and accessible only by the application server, and the second is to allow for easier updates, like the one we completed recently, to one server at a time for minimal disruption.